Skip to main content
UOIT Home
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10155/288

Issue Date:  8
Title: Evaporative drying of cupric-chloride droplets in a thermo-chemical cycle of hydrogen production
Authors: Slowikowski, Mateusz
Publisher : University of Ontario Institute of Technology
Degree : Master of Applied Science (MASc)
Department : Mechanical Engineering
Supervisor : Naterer, Greg F.
Keywords: Spray drying
Hydrogen
Cu-CI cycle
Abstract: In this thesis, new empirical correlations that predict the behaviour of Cupric-Chloride droplets undergoing spraying and drying processes are developed. Cupric-Chloride is a chemical compound with the formula CuCl2 that is present as slurry or aqueous solution within the Copper-Chlorine (Cu-Cl) thermo-chemical cycle for generation of hydrogen. An experimental study examines the effects of inlet air and liquid temperatures, pressure, concentration, nozzle diameter, and liquid flow rate on the outlet air temperature, particle size, particle size distribution, morphology, moisture content, bulk density, and flowability. The analysis examines a single droplet of CuCl2 solution in a continuum drying media. The validation of the model involves comparisons with experimental data from previous studies of different fluids based on non-dimensional analysis. The study provides new information about the effects of different concentrations of water in the CuCl2 slurry drying at low to moderate air temperatures.Analytical correlations of heat and mass transfer are developed for the aqueous solution, subject to various drying conditions. The analysis is performed for moist air in contact with a sprayed aqueous solution of Copper (II) Chloride Dihydrate [CuCl2 ·(2H2O)]. Validation of the model is performed by comparisons with experimental results.
Appears in Collections:Electronic Theses and Dissertations (Public)
Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science - Master Theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Slowikowski_Mateusz.pdf53.59 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Items in e-scholar@UOIT are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.